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Wirth named to Prairie Business ‘40 Under 40’ list

November 29, 2016:  Jamie Wirth, Ph.D., director of the Great Plains STEM Education Center at Valley City State University, has been named to Prairie Business magazine’s 2016 “40 Under 40” list, which recognizes 40 of the top business professionals under the age of 40 in the Dakotas and western Minnesota.

Also an assistant professor of mathematics at VCSU, Wirth is featured as one of the “40 Under 40” honorees in the December issue of Prairie Business magazine. The magazine recognizes young professionals who are making significant impacts in their chosen professions, industries and communities.

Wirth has directed the efforts of VCSU’s Great Plains STEM Education Center (GPSEC) since January 2015. GPSEC offers professional development workshops for teachers and STEM activities for K-12 students and parents, along with curriculum support for STEM educators.

“We’re excited to see Jamie Wirth’s talent and accomplishments recognized on the ‘40 Under 40’ list,” said VCSU President Tisa Mason. “The STEM Education Center’s program makes a huge difference in the education that K-12 students receive, and Jamie’s energy and enthusiasm for his work plays a big role in making that happen. We’re proud and privileged to have Jamie on the VCSU staff.”

Under Wirth’s leadership, GPSEC has secured multiple grants and contracts, including a competitive grant award of $298,288 from the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction through the U.S. Department of Education’s Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) program. That grant funded professional development sessions for 36 K-12 teachers in 8 North Dakota school districts: Edgeley, Ellendale, Enderlin, LaMoure, Lidgerwood, Litchville-Marion, Kensal and McClusky. GPSEC also conducted community STEM events, including Family Engineering Night and STEM Design Challenge, at each of the participating schools.

More information about the Great Plains STEM Education Center at VCSU can be found online at stem.vcsu.edu.

Wirth joined VCSU as a mathematics education instructor in 2008 and served as chair of the VCSU mathematics department from 2011–13. He was promoted to assistant professor in 2014. Wirth taught high school mathematics in Wyndmere, N.D., from 2004–08; he also served as the Wyndmere boys varsity basketball coach for three years. Wirth holds a doctorate in adult and occupational education from North Dakota State University, a master of arts in teaching degree in mathematics education from Minot State University, a bachelor’s degree in mathematics education from Mayville State University, and a bachelor’s degree in communication from the University of North Dakota.

The 2016 Prairie Business “40 Under 40” list can be found online at www.prairiebusinessmagazine.com/magazine/current-issue/4168655-prairie-business-announces-2016-40-under-40-list.


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GPSEC featured in the McClusky Gazette

STEM Family Night a fun time for all

5/18/16 (Wed)

McClusky High School gym was the place where STEM Family Night was held last Monday evening. Jamie Wirth and Gary Ketterling, teachers from Valley City State University, were there to present STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) to McClusky students and parents.

Wirth explained to them eight steps of Engineering Design Process: define, research, brainstorm, choose, build, test, communicate and redesign.
The elementary grade students had fun building a vehicle with gumdrops, lifesavers, pretzel sticks and dry spaghetti noodles; a bank with index cards and masking tape; a jewelry store with marshmallows and popsicle sticks; and an office tower with pipe cleaners and marshmallow.

The 5-8 grade and 9-12 grade were in groups to design a plan to build movement devices with golf balls, dominoes, tongue depressor, aluminum foil, play dough, masking tape, paper cups, toothpaste and toothbrush.

Click here to read the article online.

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STEM Education Center hosts Valley City 4th graders

The Great Plains STEM Education Center (GPSEC) at VCSU hosted all four sections of Valley City’s Washington Elementary fourth grade students for an integrative STEM lesson, LEGO Soccer, at the end of January 2016. Students engaged in the engineering design process to build and program LEGO WeDo robots to simulate a soccer match between an offensive player and goalie.

“The students were excited and engaged from the start,” said Jamie Wirth, Ph.D., GPSEC director. “Most of them were disappointed when it was time to leave.”  VCSU alumna Natalie Boe ’91, M.Ed. ’07, one of the fourth grade teachers at Washington, reported that her class really enjoyed working with the LEGO robots and being on the VCSU campus. “LEGO WeDo Robotics enables students to work as scientists, engineers, and mathematicians by providing them with settings, tools, and tasks for completing cross-curricular projects,” said Boe. “What I really like about this program is being able to differentiate for various ability levels of my students. It’s just awesome to watch the kids’ excitement as they think creatively to make a working model and then reflect on how to find answers and imagine new possibilities.”

According to Wirth, the LEGO soccer lesson is just one of the many projects GPSEC coordinates for students and teachers to emphasize 21st century skills in the classroom. “The designing, programming, and testing of the robots requires students to engage in creativity, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration; all valuable skills for students,” said Wirth.

To see a 2-minute highlight video of the event, click here.


NDUS
North Dakota University System highlights the GPSEC MSP grant in recent newsletter.

http://blog.ndus.edu/2224/grant-stems-development/...

Tumbling Tower
Great Plains STEM Education Center recognized in the Aberdeen, SD newspaper for MSP grant work.

Click below to read the article.

GPSEC receives $10,000 from Dakota Plains Cooperative & Land O' Lakes

On December 8, 2015 Dakota Plains Cooperative presented GPSEC with $5,000, along with a $5,000 match from Land O' Lakes to finance a STEM education project planned for school districts within the Dakota Plains customer region.  Stay tuned for more details on the project as it develops this spring.
GPSEC runs Family Engineering Night in Edgeley, ND. 

Click here to see NewsDakota.com coverage of the event.

Click here to watch a short video highlighting the event.

Click here to listen to Edgeley principals comment on the event.

Click on link below for a full PDF copy of the newspaper article from the Edgeley Mail.
GPSEC awarded a Math & Science Partnership (MSP) grant through ND DPI

Read the NewsDakota.com article here.

October 2015:  The Great Plains STEM Education Center (GPSEC) at Valley City State University has received a competitive grant award of nearly $300,000 from the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction through the U.S. Department of Education’s Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) pro

The MSP program aims to improve K–12 classroom instruction and student achievement in math and science by providing intensive, content-rich professional development to teachers.

VCSU’s GPSEC award includes $276,193 in direct funds and $22,095 in indirect money for a total of $298,288.

Dr. Jamie Wirth, GPSEC director, and Dr. Gary Ketterling, GPSEC education coordinator, will lead professional development sessions for about 40 K–12 teachers in 8 North Dakota school districts: Edgeley, Ellendale, Enderlin, LaMoure, Lidgerwood, Litchville-Marion, Kensal and McClusky.

The project, which runs from October 2015 through September 2016, will include monthly 1-day professional development sessions from November to March, followed by a 5-day summer camp for teachers in June, all on the VCSU campus.

Sessions will feature integrative STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) pedagogy training, along with a wide variety of curriculum training for teachers.



GPSEC recognized in the Jamestown Sun. 

Read article below or read online here.



STEM program working: JPS elementary teacher says more grades to be added

By Tom LaVenture, Jamestown Sun Today (9-29-15) at 7:07 a.m.

A program to help children grasp science using visual and hands-on activities was touted by an instructor at the Jamestown Public School Board meeting on Monday.

Mari Stilwell, a reading coach at Roosevelt Elementary School, updated the School Board about a $25,000 Monsanto grant to fund a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) grant pilot project for second- and fourth-graders. She said a second $25,000 grant application to the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction would fund materials and train teachers to add third and fifth grades.

“It is exciting and the kids are attracted to it and the teachers are supporting it,” she said. “This is really something to get excited about.”

The project combines science, engineering and reading in a more hands-on way to engage young learners, using the “Picture-Perfect Science Lessons” series from the National Science Teachers Association Press, Stilwell said. The pilot project succeeded in getting more students to grasp concepts in physical and life sciences and gets kids more engaged in STEM activities, she said.

The Picture Perfect science lessons are a way to integrate storybooks and picture books into science curriculum, she said. Combined with Engineering In Education kits, Stilwell said the children are more engaged and excited, which helps them to apply problem-solving skills.

“For kids with behavior issues, they were best behaved during this process,” she said.

Jamestown Public Schools Superintendent Robert Lech said the program succeeds in connecting kids to the standards in a different way. Kids at that level of understanding learn more by doing than hearing, and just need a facilitated program that works in meeting the needs of 21st century learners.

“This is making connections and engaging students in a way that is so positive,” Lech said. “We really see students connecting to the material in ways other than rote memorization of facts, and they really take in and apply and synthesize information.”

The teachers are trained by the Great Plains Stem Education Center through Valley City State University, he said.